Attachment injury

Yesterday was a glorious fall day in Virginia.  Picture perfect – crisp air, blue blue skies and the hum of changing seasons to inspire change in key areas.  All good.  Except my mood.  It started with my trying to corral my sleeping children to ready for 9:00 Mass.  We don’t go every single week so it shouldn’t be a problem (which maybe is the problem – habits, routines, predictable behaviors, anyone?) 

It started with:

You have 30 minutes to get ready.  I am not going to yell and I am not going to be late.  But there will be consequences of you aren’t in the car.

Grumble.  Growl.  Why?  I’ll go next week, I promise.  I NEVER get to sleep in.  Is Dad going?

Maybe you can relate.  Maybe not.  Maybe you are wondering why you are reading this or better yet, why I am up at 5:00 writing it.  Here’s the rub…

In Yoga we are taught to incorporate and cultivate the principle of non-attachment with our Yoga practice and our life off the mat.  The focus in our behaviors should not be attaining a desired outcome (getting your brood to Mass, running a sub 2 hour half, or standing on your head away from a wall) but rather on the intention of the (healthy) activity/endeavor/process. 


According to one analysis of non-attachment  (I love this!):

Non attachment is critical to the success of every spiritual (and physical) practice: Non-attachment is a most essential part of the yoga sutras and their practices. The less attached you are to everything, including the result of your spiritual practice (fitness regime, project at work), the more solid the ground you progress from will be. You will make steady and quick progress if you remain non-attached to the external objects, subjects and results. Attachment disturbs the mind, non-attachment makes it serene. Serenity and clarity of mind is what we want to establish so that we can move beyond the mind. All preparation practices are designed to make the mind more serene.


I was not serene in the car on the way to Mass.  None of my children took a shower, none had breakfast, only 2 of the 3 brushed their teeth (though they all swore they did) and my oldest had shorts on with barbecue sauce on the right leg.  I was not only not serene, you might say I ranted (I am not proud of this moment):

I do so much for everyone (I hate my martyr complex!) and you can’t get out of bed and come to Mass without it being a disaster.  (My voice actually broke here.  I almost cried).

Then I realized my attachment injury was acting up.

I actually have an attachment injury in my right piriformis (ahhh, butt) muscle from a wine-soaked yoga trick that’s 2 year’s old.  And it WAS acting up.  Thanks, crisp cool air.  Beautiful Fall morning, My Ass.  It always acts up at the change of seasons.

Source: chesarasarah.blogspot.com

This is not not me, but I tried to slide down into this on a picnic table with no hands.

Here are some other notions that I was attached to that caused injury to my mood:

  • I have clean, ready, prayerful, well-behaved children who willingly go to Mass because they get it.
  • I am giving my children the strong faithful foundation my parents gave me (thanks, and I miss you Mom and Dad) that has saved and served me in critical times.  (We didn’t miss Mass unless the fever was reaching 103 or more.)
  • My children will become intrigued by and be endlessly drawn to the miracle of Mass.  (I am and I want my children to be as well.)

I came out of my stupor and looked around.  My children were in the car with me on the way to a powerful and beautiful  monastery for morning Mass on a glorious fall day.  Who cares of child XX has morning breath?

Gosh Clair, get your  head out of your piriformis.  THIS is real.

Do your attachments ever act up? 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Attachment injury

  1. Love this. I need to hear/read this everyday. I think it so easy to make everything results driven. Having expectations can sometimes make a peson unhappy b/c you are never measuring up.

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